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Ward No. 5

NAME OF PANCHYAT: ANIL RAI(PRESEDENT)
WARD NAME: BIRING
TOTAL NO. OF HOUSEHOLD: 97. Total village area (in hectares): 55 hectares. Distance from nearest market/town: 11km

Background information Bering is a village of Barfung-Jarrong GPU, under Ravangla Block, South Sikkim district. The altitude of the village is 1632M/5345Ft and coordinates are 27°18’27”N and88°20’4”E respectively and is located at a distance of 63km from the block headquarter, Ravangla 26km from Namchi, the district headquarters, and at a distance of 1km from Jorethang, where the DPMU of NERLP is located. On the north of the village is L/Deythang, Anethangis on the east, Jarrong on the south, and Lingding on the west. The village has three hamlets, namely Bering,Jugathang and Sourboat.

The Bering village consists of 94 households with a total population of 444 as per the recently concluded CDP exercise. Most of the houses are widely scattered around the village. In Bering village, the people are from different communities, which are includes Chettri, Bhutia, Kami, Rai, Jogi, and Dorjee All the villagers communicate in Nepali language. The villagers follow Christian, Hindu, and Buddhist faiths.

There are 94 hhs in the village, with a population of 444 In the village, 47 hhs are included in the SHG1s formed by NERLP. The economic condition through wealth ranking by the villagers during the PRA exercise revealed that out of 94 households, 2are rich, 29 are manageable, 37are poor 26 are poorest of the poor, and 1is women headed households. Most of the houses in the village are semi pucca and some of the houses were constructed under the CMRHM Scheme. Most of the houses were made of tin roof with cement and bamboo walls with some RCC Buildings. Materials like cement were bought from the city whereas bamboo and timber were available in the village.

Livelihood Mapping The occupation of the people of Bering village is agriculture, horticulture, livestock rearing, government jobs, private jobs, wage labour, and petty business. The people of the village mostly depend on agriculture for their livelihood. Maize, paddy, ginger, cardamom, orange plantation and cherry pepper are the major crops. People sell their agricultural produce like cardamom, vegetables, fruits and ginger at their doorsteps collected by traders or at the nearby markets of Ravangla

Almost all the households rear livestock i.e. pigs, cows, goats, and hens. Other than farming villagers are also highly dependent on livestock rearing as at least one livestock is reared in every household, as it has become a trend of rural area in Sikkim that each village has to have at least one or two animals in their house. These animals are reared in a very traditional way. Some of the households are also engaged in petty business. NTFP are also collected from the forest. Some of the villagers are dependent on wage labour mainly through MGNREGA and most of the households have a job card.

Most of the households are engaged in agriculture and dairy as primary livelihood activity, followed by 90 households in this livelihood activity.

Livestock rearing All the households of the village are involved in the livestock rearing 90 households are involved in the dairy farming total; annual production of the milk in the village is 370 litres. Apart from that, other remaining households are rearing other types of the cattle. The scarcity of fodder in lean season is one of the problems related in the livestock rearing. Even the fodder available in the village is not high quality, local types of the fodder like nebara, khanu, gogun, kutmero etc. which are used. The main problem facing by the people of the village is water scarcity of water. Storage of water and community water harvesting structures can address the issued and enhance livelihoods It will really enhance the income of the farmers. They any yield any kind of horticulture and agriculture items because it is a more suitable area for both. They can develop a better quality of fodder for their livestock.

Problem of declining production in cardamom due to lack of irrigation Unfortunately, the disease and changing agricultural practices are negatively influencing the entire ecosystem surrounding cardamom1 plantations. Now, due to the declining rate of growth and production, several dependent species, especially pollinating animals, are declining in population as well. Over recent years, there has been a steady decline in large cardamom yield due to old age of the bush and prevailing viral diseases. The revival of cardamom cultivation is a dire need of the farmers in the village to reinstate its old farming practice and to address the issue of declining standard of living.

The decline in large cardamom farming has been attributed to several factors, including diseases and pests, old plantations and poor management, the unavailability of good quality planting material, and lack of irrigation facilities, training and financial support. There has also been a magnification of the indicators of climate change over the last two decades. Changes in local weather conditions such as long dry spells, changing seasons, and erratic, scanty, and unseasonal rainfall patterns have increased the incidence of diseases and pests. These climate change-related changes have also resulted in a decreased number of pollinator species, including honeybees and bumblebees. Such changes have had a devastating impact on both the socioeconomic security of mountain farmers and the ecological resilience of the system itself. The lack of support from the government in building infrastructure and facilitating market options has negatively affected the economic resilience of large cardamom-based farming, because of which farmers have had to look for off-farm employment opportunities. This situation warrants a comprehensive, integrated, and adaptive approach to improve cardamom farming as an ecologically suitable, high-value, minimally labour-intensive, and non-perishable natural resource-based household livelihood option. The irrigation of cardamom farms through the community water harvesting structures, development of new plantation areas by replacing the open-cropped area largely around households, management of diseases and pests, and the introduction of the new disease resistant and high yielding cultivar are some of the adaptive options.

TOTAL HOUSES

SCSTOBCOTHERSTOTAL
45 61 163 182 451

HOUSEHOLD TOTAL

TOTAL HOUSEHOLDSTOTAL POPULATIONMALEFEMALE
94 451 238 213

HOUSES

PUCCAKUCCHASEMI-PUKKA
11 08 78

PEOPLE

NON-LOCALINDIANNON-INDIANTOTAL
03 02 01 06

TOTAL NO. OF IAY,MMAY,CMRHM,RED-RH 26 NOS

IAYMMAYCMRHMRED-RH
05 02 03 03

TOTAL NO. OF WELFARE SCHEME 35 NOS

OAPWIDOWSAMAJGIK SEWAOTHERS
06 01 02 01 (SUDENI)

RATION

BPLMMAAYMMKSAOTHERS
38 04 17 -

LANDLESS HOUSEHOLD WITHOUT ELECTRICITY WITHOUT WATER WITHOUT HOUSE
1 - 03 05 02

GOVT. SCHOOLPVT. SCHOOLICDSCRASE TEMPLE GUMPA CHURCH OTHERS
02 01 01 - 01 - - -

ILLITERATE LITERATE UPTO CL-V UPTO CL-VIII CLASS X AND ABOVE TOTAL
10 67 201 145 98 512

EMPLOYEES
MALE FEMALE
21 11

HERITAGE HOMESTAY
- 01

COWS BUFFALO PIG GOAT SHEEP POULTRY OTHERS TOTAL
95 03 17 61 02 115 - 293